locals like Mr Rudd the baker, and samples his newly-baked bread.Before too long, Harold is back at the family's farmhouse. He is in the chicken yard with Don Lackmann, who is also nine years old, when Don catches a goanna trying to get to the chooks.

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Harold is impressed to see Don grab the goanna by its tail and propel this dragon-like creature safely away. In another tale, Harold helps to catch a canine felon with some skilful archery.

 

In one of Raye's stories it is Alice, Harold and
Jasper who get to visit the Lackmanns. Alice was
ten, Harold nine and Jasper merely six years old.
They have quite a lively and adventurous outing.
They get to play games, feed the cattle and nearly
get into trouble when Don is caught stealing
apples in a neighbour's orchard. 

 

Part Two of the book is a series of imaginative
tales of mystery and fantasy which were greatly
loved by Raye's grandchildren. Jasper and Alice
were the key players in these quirky cameos.

 

These delightful escapades and adventures open
a window into Raye’s 1930s childhood and
imagination and are recounted not only with great
affection for our heritage but also with abundant
love for her four grandchildren.      
                        
(ENDS — 440 words)

IN THE 1920s and 30s, Raye Lackmann was just a little girl growing up in a big family on a 640-acre wheat and sheep farm outside Murrayville in the dry north-west corner of the State of Victoria. The town is on the Mallee Highway just 22 Km from the border with South Australia.

 

She is now Raye McLennan and is Grandma to
Alice, Harold, Jasper and Florence. Now in her
nineties, she wrote these stories some years ago
for them when they were youngsters. In these
delightful little tales of long ago, Raye is able to
share with her modern-day grandchildren the
pleasures and pitfalls of growing up in Victoria's
famous ‘Sunset Country'.

 

In Part One the children are mysteriously taken
back in time to join Raye, her family and friends.
Seven year old Florence is soon seen feeding the
ducks and chooks and looking after the babies in
the pram. On her next visit, now about eight years
old, Florence joins twelve year old Raye at her
school.

 

Harold is just six when he too gets to join the
Lackmann children at the local school. They en-
courage him to join in their games and he has a
great time. He gets to encounter the local wildlife
and helps to feed the horses. On his next visit he
gets to see Raye's father playing golf and meets the